Technology

Top Mobile Trends to Watch in 2016

By Toni Fuhrman  11/10/15

Two visionary IT experts discuss the biggest trends in mobile for the coming year, from 3D touch and virtual reality to wearables and the Internet of Things.

Top Mobile Trends to Watch in 2016

For years, mobile technologies have had an enormous influence on higher education, changing the way students communicate, access information and learn. And there’s no sign of mobile losing steam anytime soon. According to the2015 NMC Horizon Report, which forecasted the most important ed tech developments in higher education, mobile-related trends will rule for at least the next five years: In the short term, with a time-to-adoption horizon of one year of less, the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) phenomenon will proliferate; in the mid-term (two to three years) wearable technologies will see significant growth; and in the long-term (four to five years), the Internet of Things (IoT) will have wide-reaching impact.

Mobile, BYOD, wearables and IoT are all familiar territory for Robbie Melton,

Why businesses are turning to managed IT services

By  :   CIO | Jun 3, 2015

Organizations are increasingly turning to managed service providers (MSPs) to handle elements of their IT needs as part of a collaborative arrangement with the internal IT department, according to new research from IT industry trade association CompTIA.

It’s hard to become a nimble, digital disruptor if you’re weighed down by systems anchored in the past.

MSPs have been around for a long time, but adoption has been relatively low. As late as last year CompTIA found that only 3-in-10 organizations had any of their IT in the hands of an MSP, says Carolyn April, senior director, Industry Analysis, at CompTIA. But more than two-thirds of companies surveyed for CompTIA’s Fourth Annual Trends in Managed Services Study, released Monday, say they have used the services of an outside IT firm within the past 12 months.

CNET Review of Windows 10

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THE GOOD Windows 10 bridges the gap between PCs and tablets without alienating anyone. The new OS combines the best bits of old and new Windows features into a cohesive package, while correcting nearly all of the missteps of Windows 8. The upgrade process is mostly painless, and free for most Windows 7 and 8 users.

THE BAD Many of the new features will be lost on those who don’t care about touch. Automatic, forced updates could spell trouble later on. Cortana’s features are better suited for smartphones.

THE BOTTOM LINE Windows 10 delivers a refined, vastly improved vision for the future of computing with an operating system that’s equally at home on tablets and traditional PCs — and it’s a free upgrade for most users.

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